Linking African pastoralist and scientific knowledge: Mbororo in Chad
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Linking African pastoralist and scientific knowledge: Mbororo in Chad

Mbororo in Chad
Linking African pastoralist and scientific knowledge: Mbororo in Chad

The presentation is based on interviews in the nomadic Mbororo pastoralists of Chad in the Lake Chad. These interviews were done in under Mbororo sub-group called Mbimbe Woila.

When faced with unexpected weather events, pastoralists have to take decisions that may have impacts on their cultures, livelihoods and relationships with other neighbouring communities. The Mbororo pastoralists are cattle herders, with one of the greatest ranges of transhumance on the African continent. During periods of drought, Mbororo pastoralists have to adapt by changing the composition of their herds or travel longer distances, sometimes in excess of 1000 kilometres, in search of pasture. The decision to move cattle across landscapes can trigger problems with farmers who are also facing weather stress.

 

“Given the difficulties we face in and out of the lake, we can no longer access the pastures covered by seawater and are forced to live as nomads within the Lake Chad to Bol (capital of the Lake) for the dry season”

Lamido, Mai Mani (traditional chief) 65 years

 

The presentation acknowledge the first outcomes of community-led research on pastoralist knowledge and responses to drought in Lake Chad. It also present the outcomes of an innovative collaboration, spearheaded by the Indigenous Peoples’ of Africa Coordinating Committee (IPACC) with African government, UN agencies and NGO partners. IPACC’s initiative draws on the fact that both climatologists and nomadic herders use predictive knowledge systems (one scientific, the other traditional and based on actual nature observation), to estimate medium-term (one to ten year cycles) climate and meteorological behaviour. The initiative brings the two knowledge systems together to provide for a stronger approach, based on a joint strategy of scientific atmospheric forecasting and nature based observation and forecasting to improve food security in dryland pastoralism, provide early warning and reduce risks.

 

© Transhumance zone of Mbororo peuple around Lake Chad

 

  • Region:  Africa
  • People/Coummunity: Lake Chad, Chad
  • Proponent: Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim, Association des Femmes Peules Autochtones du Tchad
  • Date: November 2011
  • Topics: knowing and observing of weather, storytelling and climate change
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