ZAMBIA’S POOR FARMERS HIT BY CLIMATE CHANGE
  • Home
  • >
  • ZAMBIA’S POOR FARMERS HIT BY CLIMATE CHANGE

ZAMBIA’S POOR FARMERS HIT BY CLIMATE CHANGE

CENTRAL PROVINCE OF ZAMBIA
ZAMBIA’S POOR FARMERS HIT BY CLIMATE CHANGE

Grace Nzovwa Zulu is a journalist from the Central province, Lusaka, Zambia who wishes to highlight how traditional farming communities of Central Zambia are surviving amid climate change, focusing mainly on their agricultural practices alongside their cultural norms. Using newspaper supplements, she hopes to broaden national understanding on the extent of the impact of climate change and how people are adapting.

In the recent past the poor farming community has suffered from climate change effects such as droughts, change in weather patterns, high temperatures, land degradation and crop failure which has threatened food security and settlements, forcing them to opt for relocation to new areas in search of better conditions.

There have been a variety of methods that the traditional farmers have adopted to cope which include: adopting conservation farming, irrigation technologies and improving drainage systems, crop diversification, alternative livestock and pasture management, use of wetlands during off season, crop storage and marketing, venturing into agroforestry, expansion of microcredit schemes, establishment of farmer groups and cooperatives.

Moreover, ancient traditional norms observed by the rural communities including farmers are being threatened with extinction as people are moving from their original traditional lands as they become less productive. 

Finally, the research highlights the impacts of climate change on communities that depend on dry and semi-humid land for livelihoods. Climate change is expected to add more stress on traditional farmers in Central Zambia, as they are exposed to increased droughts and floods which is threatening food security and settlements.

 

  • Region: Africa
  • People/Coummunity: Central Province, Lusaka, Zambia
  • Proponent: Grace Nzovwa Zulu
  • Date: July 2009 to December 2010
  • Topics: knowing and observing of weather, storytelling and climate change